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Idea: the healthy hair diet - a pill-free nutritional solution to hair loss

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Tuesday
May242011

Sexless Fruitarians & Impotent Cavemen

Date Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at 12:19PM

Restricting macronutrients and calories can lead to massive
fluctuation in sexual appetite. I am currently writing a mega-post on
this, so I'll keep this short, but as a preface here are two examples
of radically different diets with similar effects.

The first story is from Michael Arnstein, a long-term athletic
fruitarian. Michael posted the topic, "Is it lack of
calories/sleep/water or 9/5/5 that cuts your sex drive?" on the 30
Bananas A Day Forum where he said:

"I've been eating 955 for a while, I do have some fat like avocado's
once in a while, or the white meat from a fresh coconut, but pretty
much 95% of the time I'm just eating 955. I notice I almost never have
a sex drive anymore. I do extremely intense workouts and think I
generally get enough sleep most of the time, so my body is working
really well, but my sex drive (the 'drive' when you 'gotta have it') is
just gone since going hard core 811."

It's funny because I don't identify with this at all. In my dietary
adventures, I always took low sex drive as an ominous sign. Michael
feels almost the complete opposite:

"I tell my wife...that in nature animals reproduce once a year - at
most! lots of animals go years without reproducing. I tell her that the
media and these s*** women's magazines only talk about sex and push
everyone to think that if you're not having sex 10 times a day your
life sucks or something..."

Michael answers his own question when he explains that consuming "overt
fats" increases his desire:

"Funny when I do have overt fats I can feel the 'urge' a lot more to
have sex..."

Click to read more ...
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Category- Sex, Category- Vegan
Monday
May092011

Peat-a-tarianism

Date Monday, May 9, 2011 at 10:00AM

I'm honestly not sure why I find Ray Peat so interesting.
Perhaps it's because he eats a quart of ice cream a day, or that I
really have never seen a clear picture of him, or maybe it's that he is
unintentionally really funny in interviews with Josh Rubin. Whatever it
is, I feel like Ray is the grandpa I've always wanted.

Incorporating Peat's ideas hasn't been all fun and games however. He
has made my life exponentially more difficult in one area.

When the inevitable "Well Danny, what diet are you doing now?" question
arises, explaining "Peat-a-tarianism" is difficult, if not impossible.

I usually attempt to get the individual to retract the statement or end
up being a gigantic douche and explaining that it is probably over
their heads.

Anyways... In a recent post I went over Ray Peat's dietary philosophy
and compared it to the ever-popular paleo movement.

In this post I wanted to go over foods I've been consuming in my
Peatatarianism adventure. I hope that this will be a resource for
others who attempt to emulate Peat's diet.

Click to read more ...
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Category- Ray Peat, Category- Sex
Monday
May022011

You Don't Know How Fun Calcium, Prolactin & Parathyroid Are Until You've Read
This Post

Date Monday, May 2, 2011 at 11:00AM

As I mentioned earlier, Dr. Peat is a big fan of raw dairy as
a source of protein. Like Peat's ideas about orange juice, I didn't
understand until I dug into his articles and stumbled upon the
connection between the parathyroid, prolactin, calcium, and vitamin D.

To my understanding, the parathyroid gland's job is to regulate the
amount of calcium and phosphate in the body. When there is a deficient
amount of dietary calcium the parathyroid glands (PTH) increase
production of osteoclasts, which break down bone in order to obtain
calcium.

Dr. Peat explains that this increase in PTH creates an inflammatory
reaction:

"A deficiency of either calcium or magnesium can stimulate the
parathyroid glands to produce more hormone (parathyroid hormone, PTH),
which increases calcium absorption, but also removes calcium from the
bones. This hormone, responding to a dietary calcium or magnesium
deficiency, is an important factor in causing cells to take up too much
calcium, and its excess is associated with many inflammatory and
degenerative diseases."

The increase in PTH also leads to an increase in interleukin-6 which is
an inflammatory hormone associated with hair loss. Peat explains that
not only does IL-6 cause inflammation, but it also increases prolactin,
which he believes to be part of a vicious cycle of inflammation, stress
and bone loss:

"Prolactin, which is increased under the influence of estrogen or
serotonin, causes the body to lose calcium (drawing it from the bones),
and it stimulates the secretion of PTH, which compensates for the
calcium loss by increasing its mobilization from bones. Prolactins
action on bone is at least partly by increasing IL-6 formation; IL-6
stimulates the release of prolactin. Serotonin and IL-6 stimulate each
others secretion, and PTH and serotonin each stimulate the others
release."

This may be a solid reason to include some raw dairy your regimen.
Besides being a good source of protein, vitamin A, K2 and cholesterol,
raw dairy is a superb source of calcium.

Click to read more ...
Share Article- Share Article | in Category- Hair Loss,
Category- Ray Peat
Monday
Apr252011

Redefining The Horsemen: Hair Loss From A New Angle

Date Monday, April 25, 2011 at 10:00AM

If there is one thing I've learned in writing about health
it's that things can change. Take for example my relationship with
cats. I hate cats. They make my eyes swell up and they are completely
worthless. They roam around all day without a care in the world, chew
on important papers, and constantly look at you for no reason. With all
that said, I have grown to love interesting photos of them.

In the same vain, I've been confronted with personal experiences and
evidence that suggests that I missed some very important factors that
need to be addressed when tackling any kind of hair loss.

For the last year or so I've maintained the idea that the four most
important elements in treating hair loss were:

1.) Correcting a dysregulation of hormones 2.) Combatting
inflammation 3.) Correcting deficiencies with nutrient dense foods
and 4.) Making a concious effort to reduce stress.

It's not that my old thoughts were incorrect (way to go Danny!), but
rather they are down stream from more present issues. After a rough
start to the New Year and exhaustive research, I can tell you without a
doubt that stress, in all its forms, is the BIGGEST confounding factor
in treating hair loss.

Let's go over some variables that I originally overlooked:

Chronic Infections

Any bacterial, fungal, or viral infection can dwarf your chances of
stopping your hair loss. Take for example H. Pylori, an extremely
common infection that many Americans harbor in their small intestines.
H. Pylori destroys hair by elevating cortisol, increasing inflammatory
markers, decreasing IGF-1, and leads to malabsorption due to lack of
adequate stomach acid:

"The circulating IGF/IGFBP system is altered in patients infected with
H. pylori. The increased level of cortisol suggests the involvement of
the hypothalamic/pituitary/adrenal axis that stimulates the elevation
of blood glucose, probably in coordination with decreased IGF activity
to minimize anabolic metabolism."

In addition, those with low thyroids may be wasting their time with
meds if they have an H. Pylori infection:

"In hypothyroid cases, H. pylori gastritis may be responsible for an
inadequate response to the treatment. H. pylori eradication in the
cases receiving high doses of thyroxine has a risk for thyrotoxicosis."

Click to read more ...
Share Article- Share Article | in Category- Hair Loss,
Category- Ray Peat
Monday
Apr182011

The New Hotness: Bone Broth

Date Monday, April 18, 2011 at 11:31AM

BONE BROTH IS HOT! Ray Peat, Chris Kresser, Matt Stone, Chris
Masterjohn, Sean Croxton, Sally Fallon -- they're all doing it.

What's the big deal you ask? It depends on whom you're asking. Sally
Fallon would say that bone broth is nutrient-dense treat.

Ray Peat would explain that the amino acids methionine, cysteine, and
tryptophan that are found in large amounts in muscle meat, have an
anti-metabolic effect. Peat suggests that balancing muscle meat with a
rich source of gelatin counters the negative effects of methionine,
cysteine and tryptophan leading to a more efficient metabolism (healthy
thyroid).

Peat and Sally both have some great points, but I'm more interested in
bone broth (gelatin) to see if it has any benefits for those with hair
loss. So far it appears that the digestive enhancing, anti-stress and
gut restoring qualities might make gelatin a worth-wild part of your
hair loss regimen.

Here is what I've found so far:

Digestion

Ray Peat explains that glycine, the main amino acid found in gelatin,
may be useful in combating hydrochloric acid deficiency and increasing
digestive capabilities:

Glycine also helps digestion by enhancing gastric acid secretion.
Research published in 1976 established that only proteins stimulate
gastric acid secretion, but apparently not all amino acids do so.
Glycine is one of those that do, a fact that was known in 1925. The
effects of other amino acids and their related peptides on acid
secretion has not been determined, but researchers have proposed that
"glycine may have application in the design of chemically defined diets
for patients with gastrointestinal disorders."

Chris Kresser notes that gelatin can be a useful tool in repairing the
integrity of the gut:

Click to read more ...
Share Article- Share Article | in Category- Hair Loss,
Category- Health, Category- Ray Peat
Monday
Apr112011

I Fell Off The Wagon

Date Monday, April 11, 2011 at 10:01AM

In an episode of The Healthy Skeptic Podcast, Chris Kresser
recalled an experienced he had while working for a holistic physician.
He explained that an emaciated sickly gentleman could not regain his
health on the strictest of diets. Despite adhering to a very rigid
regimen, the man could not return to equilibrium.

The patient disappeared for 6 months and when he returned Chris and the
physician didn't recognized him. He was at a healthy weight, his voice
was different, and his complexion had changed. When the doctor started
probing the man for the dietary strategy behind his transformation, he
replied that he had gone on "The beer and pizza diet."

While Chris was telling this story to Dr. Harris on the podcast I felt
like tearing up. I couldn't help but feel extremely saddend when
comparing my own experience to the gentleman in Chris's story.

For the last four years I have consumed 99% homemade food, abstained
from sugar, vegetable oils and gluten; as if they were the plague, and
I have little, if anything to show for it.

My neurotic quest for perfection secluded me from group activities,
drove away a girl that I cared more than anything about, and has left
me to critically evaluate my goal for engaging in all of this dietary
lunacy.

Do youself a favor and do not end up like me. Have fun, abstain from
very toxic foods, but don't let it consume your life.

Part Two

Part two of this long winded rant has to do with my credibility or lack
thereof. I am completely aware that some of my posts can come off as
extremely hyperbolic.

This may be hard to understand for those of you without chronic health
issues, but when you have been dealing nagging symptoms like cold hands
and feet and intermittent libido for years -- and simple sugars, at
least initially, radically improves both conditions -- (I have
successfully become the bull), I get excited. Fucking really excited.

This small change makes me not care (at all) if Dr. Ray Peat's
mechanisms or reasoning is accurate. In the "black box" model of the
body I am (initially) benefiting from his ideas.

Click to read more ...
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Category- Ray Peat, Category- Sex
Monday
Apr042011

Peat vs. Paleo

Date Monday, April 4, 2011 at 10:00AM

Updated on Monday, April 4, 2011 at 9:16PM by Registered
Commenter- Danny Roddy

It's hard to reconcile Ray Peat's ideas about the body and
nutrition with the paleo/primal lifestyle. Paleo enthusiasts can get
behind Peat's ideas about avoiding gluten and increasing saturated
fat, but Peat's incorporation of simple sugars can create cognitive
dissonance in some. Hell, even I had a hard time wrapping my head
around the concept and I've spent an extended amount of time on a very
high-starch version of my own diet (potatoes, saturated fat, meat).

While the addition of starch seems to be cutting edge in the
paleosphere, Pete is guzzling salted orange juice along with a single
carrot to inhibit estrogen reuptake. Is he crazy? Maybe. Can we learn
something from him? Yes.

I do not intend to suggest that one way is better than the other, but I
do want to highlight some areas were the two styles of eating part
ways. Let's go over the differences between The Paleo Diet and from
what I can put together, what Ray Peat consumes. Peat doesn't have a
home page for his diet, because he's a biologist and not a diet guru,
so I have pieced together Peat's diet from his articles, interviews,
and random texts from the internet. Hopefully I didn't screw it up.

Fats

Paleo: We'll start with a macronutrient that isn't too controversial.
Paleo dieters dig natural saturated fats (animal, coconut, butter, red
palm oil) and have a love/hate relationship with omega-3 oils (fish,
krill, flax). In the beginning, supplementation of omega-3s was HOT and
many were megadosing to overcome inflammatory conditions. Since then,
progressive paleoers (Paleo 2.0ers?) like Dr. Kurt Harris and Chris
Kresser slapped the community with some sense explaining that the
composition of fish oils is very similar to that of harmful vegetable
oils.

Ray Peat: Similar to the paleosphere, Peat believes that saturated fat
is good for you. He disagrees however that ANY unsaturated fatty acids
are "essential," and goes as far as to say that one should avoid most
vegetables (especially the juices) because of the small amount of PUFA
they contain. Peat also differs in theories on behind PUFA's mechanism
of being harmful. Rather than focusing on inflammation and oxidative
stress, Peat suggests that they are harfmul due to their estrogenic,
anti-thyroid and pro-cortisol effects.

Click to read more ...
Share Article- Share Article | in Category- Paleo,
Category- Ray Peat
Monday
Mar212011

The Root of All Evil: Sugar or Estrogen?

Date Monday, March 21, 2011 at 11:00AM

Updated on Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 11:41PM by Registered
Commenter- Danny Roddy

Ray Peat's ideas are unorthodox, thoughtprovoking, and
awesome. No matter what your criticism of him, he is doing his own
thing, which I respect. Having said that, it doesn't mean that I didn't
think some of his nutritional recommendations were completely batshit
insane upon first glance.

Take Peat's stance on orange juice. He has mentioned that he drinks at
least a quart of 100% orange juice a day, for the magnesium, potassium,
and the vitamin C content. I could not even begin to grasp Peat's
decision until I remembered a technique that Dr. Datis Kharrazian uses
to "unwind" insulin resistance in his patients:

"I suggest fasting three to five days. A minimum of three days is
required for best results. If you are feeling good and following my
fasting rules, you may go longer than five days (one of my patients
went as long as four weeks). During the fast, do not take any
supplements, use hormone creams, or even popular skin creams, as many
skin creams contain hidden estrogens that will hamper your results."

Dr. Kharrazian goes on to explain that the fast consists of maple
syrup, water and freshly squeezed lemon or limejuice. He instructs his
patients to sip the syrup drink every 15 minutes during waking hours.
Dr. Kharrazian suggests that the fast calms the digestive tracts and
decreases inflammation of his patients with Hashimoto's disease (gluten
intolerance).

What's with the maple syrup you ask?

In an interview with Jimmy Moore, Dr. Kharrazian explains that having a
constant flow of glucose is an important part of supporting the
glucuronidation pathway, which needs to be in working order to
inactivate "used up" estrogen in the liver and brain. The simple sugar
boosts the patients glucuronic acid levels enabling them to clear out
their "old" hormones.

Click to read more ...
Share Article- Share Article | in Category- Hair Loss,
Category- Health, Category- Ray Peat
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Do your own research and come to your own conclusions. Trust no one,
including me. This blog is a compilation of my opinions. It's not
advice; it's information that you can take or leave as you please. Be
weary of placing your health in the hands of medical practitioners. No
one will figure things out for you. My body has been my laboratory over
the years, but we're all unique biochemically, so please use what you
learn here carefully- what works for one may not necessarily work for
another. Please consider anything you read on dannyroddy to be
information only, it is not medical advice.

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